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Rec: Meyer-Lemon Pudding Cake

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Joined: Dec 9, 2005

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Posted to Thread #283 at 5:56 pm on Dec 30, 2005

These yield more than four servings but they store really well in the refrigerator for several days. Sometimes I share extras with the neighbors who provide me with the meyer lemons. :o)

Just made these for a dinner party and garnished with chantilly cream and fresh raspberries in lieu of the oranges. Very yummy.

Meyer-Lemon Pudding Cake
York Street, Dallas
This fabulous dessert uses Meyer lemons and blood oranges, but regular lemons and oranges may be substituted.
http://www.texasmonthly.com/mag/issues/2002-02-01/recipe.php

Cake:
3 egg whites
1/4 cup and 2/3 cup sugar, in separate batches
1/4 cup flour
7 tbsp fresh Meyer-lemon juice (about 2-3 lemons)
1/4 cup melted butter
1 tbsp grated zest of a Meyer lemon, chopped if the pieces are too long
3 egg yolks
1-1/2 cups buttermilk

Note: Meyer lemons are sweeter and softer than regular lemons. You will need a total of 3 Meyer lemons (medium size or larger) for the cake recipe and the garnish; one will be used mainly for zest.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a mixing bowl beat the egg whites and 1/4 cup sugar until stiff peaks form. Set aside. In a small bowl mix together 2/3 cup sugar and the flour and set aside. In another bowl mix together the lemon juice, melted butter, and lemon zest. Add this to the flour mixture and stir well. In yet another bowl combine the egg yolks and the buttermilk. Add to the lemon mixture and stir well. If you are using regular lemons, taste to be sure the mixture is sweet enough. Using a rubber spatula, fold the beaten egg whites into the lemon—egg yolk mixture.

Butter and sugar 6 soufflé cups or ramekins and fill 3/4 full. Bake in a water bath until top feels slightly firm, about 40 minutes. Do not brown. The individual cakes will consist of 2 distinct layers, cake and pudding. If you prefer a more cakelike texture throughout, bake longer and let them brown a bit. Remove from the oven and immediately take the ramekins out of the water bath. Let cool to room temperature and then chill for 2 hours to overnight. The pudding cakes can be served in the ramekins with the cake on top, or inverted onto plates so that the pudding layer is on top.

Garnish:
1/2 cup whipping cream (or heavy cream)
juice of 1/2 regular orange
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar
zest of 1 Meyer lemon
2 blood oranges, peeled and cut into clean segments (a pint of any type of fresh berries may be substituted) Note: Blood oranges have bright red interiors and are sweet-tart.

Whip cream and a teaspoon of the sugar together and set aside. Put the orange juice, the remaining sugar, and the lemon zest in a bowl and stir to mix. Add blood-orange segments.

To serve, garnish the chilled cakes with a dollop of whipped cream and arrange the sweetened orange segments around them. Serves 6.

Pat's notes: These pudding cakes are yummy. Sometimes I leave them in the oven a bit longer to become more cake-like. Don’t have the recommended souffle dishes so I use 4 oz. ramekins which yield 10-12 pudding cakes.


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