Some cosmetic changes in preparation for larger site changes in the works.

Close
Pat-NoCal

Believe I'm using Charlie's treatment for Corned Beef and Cabbage

Veteran Member
5865 posts
Joined: Dec 9, 2005

Options

Posted to Thread #29488 at 11:26 am on Mar 17, 2017

or possibly another oven-braised recipe, though this particular recipe always turns out so well for me.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Why this recipe works: Corned beef and cabbage makes its way to the dinner table (in this country, anyway) but once a year in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, and maybe for good reason. This meat can be unbearably salty, dry, and rubbery. And when cooked with the stale spice packet that often gets packaged with the meat, it’s flavorless at best. The accompanying vegetables are usually mushy, greasy, and monotone in flavor. To solve the dry, stringy meat texture, we got rid of the typical stovetop simmer and moved a covered pot into a low-temperature oven for gentler cooking. To help flavor the meat, we replaced some of the water with chicken broth and added celery, carrot, and onion, along with peppercorns, allspice, a bay leaf, and thyme, to the cooking liquid. For the cabbage, carrots, and potatoes typically served with the corned beef, we strained and defatted the cooking liquid and then cooked the vegetables in stages––potatoes first, then carrots and cabbage. A little butter added to the pot helped flavor the vegetables.

1 (4-5 lb) corned beef brisket roast, rinsed, fat trimmed to 1/4 inch thick
4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
4 cups water
12 carrots, peeled (3 chopped, 9 halved crosswise)
2 celery ribs, chopped
1 onion, peeled and quartered
3 bay leaves
1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
1 teaspoon whole allspice
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1-1/2 lbs small red potatoes
1 head green cabbage (2 pounds), cut into 8 (2-inch) wedges
Pepper

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 300 degrees. Combine beef, broth, water, chopped carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, thyme, and allspice in Dutch oven. Cover and bake until fork slips easily in and out of meat, 4-1/2 to 5 hours.
2. Transfer meat to 13x9-inch baking dish. Strain cooking liquid through fine-mesh strainer into large bowl, discard solids, and skim fat from liquid. Pour 1 cup cooking liquid over meat. Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and let rest for 30 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, return remaining cooking liquid to Dutch oven, add butter, and bring to simmer over medium-high heat. Add potatoes and simmer until they begin to soften, about 10 minutes. Add carrot halves and cabbage, cover, and cook until tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer vegetables to serving platter and season with pepper to taste. (Reserve cooking liquid for making Creamed Chipped Beef using leftover corned beef; recipe at right.)
4. Transfer beef to carving board and slice against grain into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Serve with vegetables.

Notes: Use flat-cut corned beef brisket, not point-cut; it’s more uniform in shape and thus will cook more evenly. When slicing the cabbage, leave the core intact or the cabbage will fall apart during cooking.

TO MAKE AHEAD: Prepare corned beef through step 2. Refrigerate moistened beef and cooking liquid separately for up to 24 hours. To serve, adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 350 degrees. Transfer meat to carving board and slice against grain into 1/4" thick slices and return to baking dish. Cover dish tightly with foil and bake until meat is heated through, about 25 minutes. While meat is heating, proceed with step 3.
Serves 6 to 8
Source: Charlie from Cookscountry.com
Charlie’s note: Second year making this recipe. It takes a long time (4-1/2 -5 hrs) in the oven, but with no effort, no having to check water level, etc. The beef comes out wonderfully tender, but not falling apart; less salty than usual (my guess is that putting it in cool liquid and having the oven temp so low, gently poaches the roast and leaches out excess salt. By adding a lump of butter before adding the veggies makes them taste rich and wonderful.


Other messages in this thread: